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-   -   Coparenting in the Context of Family Violence (https://www.ottawadivorce.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23442)

helenj 01-12-2021 10:55 PM

Coparenting in the Context of Family Violence
 
Key paragraphs:

"family violence allegations are often used to deprive children of contact with their parents"

"And shared parenting is positively related to parental cooperation. Comparing parental outcomes in joint versus sole custody families, shared parenting is associated with a significant reduction of parental conflict levels. There is no evidence that to support the contention that shared parenting increases parental conflict, and research does not support a presumption that the amount of parenting time should be limited in cases of high conflict, and high conflict should not be used to justify restrictions on children’s contact with either of their parents."

"The adversarial “winner-take-all” child custody system seems almost tailor-made to produce the worst possible outcomes, where parents become polarized when the stakes are high, and disagreements become intense conflicts, with the potential to escalate into situations of violence. The threat of losing one’s children in a custody contest exacerbates and creates violence."

"shared parenting is associated with decreased parental conflict levels. A high-conflict case not involving violence has a much higher likelihood of escalating to violence when one’s relationship with one’s child is threatened by loss of custody. The sole custody regime elevates the risk of spousal abuse in these cases."

"the conference found that when spousal violence does exist, it usually involves bilateral or reciprocal violence. Cases of family violence in the context of child custody disputes come in different forms, including ongoing or episodic male battering, female initiated violence, male controlling interactive violence, separation and divorce violence, and psychotic and paranoid reactions. Mutual violence is the most common type, with male battering (the classic “cycle of violence” paradigm) constituting only one-fifth of family violence in separation and divorce cases. Not all acts of intimate partner violence in contested custody cases have motivations and expressions derived from a structurally derived male assumption of entitlement and need for control."

" is erroneous, however, to assume that high conflict cases, in which parents disagree on custodial arrangements for children after divorce, commonly involve serious family violence. This places children at risk of losing one of their parents via a sole custody or primary residence order, and increases the risk of family violence in the majority of contested custody cases that did not previously involve violence."

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/b...C6TgMFUEh8G_Ns

iona6656 02-10-2021 11:24 AM

At the risk of giving this crackpot poster a further platform- this article is garbage, in my opinion.

To other poster's reading this thread- if you are being asked to co-parent in the context of intimate partner or family violence. Don't base your decisions on some magazine article (note- psychology today is *not* a peer reviewed journal).

Seek out the assistance of a lawyer who has experience with intimate partner violence. Or other organizations or non-profits that can help you through your matter.

Tayken 02-10-2021 06:25 PM

Truisms Exposed?: The difficulty with the term "abuse"... (Case Law)

See: https://www.ottawadivorce.com/forum/...ad.php?t=16809

The topic has been canvased a lot on the site. Ample case law in support of the argument. As well, Edward Kruk, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of British Columbia and highly regarded on the subject matter.

I can't comment on the "crackpot" OP at this time. There does appear to be a theme to the postings in my quick scan of past posting but, the article that is posted is not controversial. Nor does it put anyone at risk in my humble opinion should they read it.

If someone is being assaulted they shouldn't be calling a lawyer they should be calling the police.

tilt 02-12-2021 12:15 AM

Nah, this is a shite article by a Fringe Social Worker who is promoting his own services and foundation for her personal financial gain. He also writes for an American audience, Canadian Courts have been very clear that they are guided by the best interest of the child and not the best interest of the parents, and they have acknowledged the known over-use of the term "parental alienation" specifically by abusive fathers (as can be seen in the 2021 amendments to the Divorce Act).

One way to evaluate the credentials of an academic is to look at who they co-authour with. He doesn't work with anyone, which means he probably has no credibility in his own field by his peers.

He does really well at self-promotion though, his SEO is pretty strong, something that again, true academics don't focus on as they would rather pursue truth than notoriety.

Tayken 02-17-2021 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tilt (Post 245337)
Nah, this is a shite article by a Fringe Social Worker who is promoting his own services and foundation for her personal financial gain. He also writes for an American audience, Canadian Courts have been very clear that they are guided by the best interest of the child and not the best interest of the parents, and they have acknowledged the known over-use of the term "parental alienation" specifically by abusive fathers (as can be seen in the 2021 amendments to the Divorce Act).

One way to evaluate the credentials of an academic is to look at who they co-authour with. He doesn't work with anyone, which means he probably has no credibility in his own field by his peers.

He does really well at self-promotion though, his SEO is pretty strong, something that again, true academics don't focus on as they would rather pursue truth than notoriety.

Are we talking about the same person from UBC?

https://socialwork.ubc.ca/profile/edward-kruk/

iona6656 02-19-2021 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tayken (Post 245323)
Truisms Exposed?: The difficulty with the term "abuse"... (Case Law)

See: https://www.ottawadivorce.com/forum/...ad.php?t=16809

The topic has been canvased a lot on the site. Ample case law in support of the argument. As well, Edward Kruk, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of British Columbia and highly regarded on the subject matter.

I can't comment on the "crackpot" OP at this time. There does appear to be a theme to the postings in my quick scan of past posting but, the article that is posted is not controversial. Nor does it put anyone at risk in my humble opinion should they read it.

If someone is being assaulted they shouldn't be calling a lawyer they should be calling the police.

I re-read the article. I don't think it's total garbage- but the context in which the OP originally posted it- is concerning. Also- the way the article is set up- it's click bait.

It just may be my interpretation- but he seems to be saying "co-parenting can actually bring down the risk of family violence"- but that is contingent on there not being a history of family violence. That seems like a given?

Almost towards the end of the article- he posts this:

" it is erroneous, however, to assume that high conflict cases, in which parents disagree on custodial arrangements for children after divorce, commonly involve serious family violence. "

....that is a decent premise. But the rest is garbled. Plus the article's title is "Co-parenting in the Context of Family Violence"- to which - multiple times throughout the article he says 'Well- if there IS established violence, well- that's a different issue'.

I think it's a good idea to have more discussion around assessing family violence in determining custodial and parenting arrangements. Absolutely. But my concern is that anyone who stumbles across this thread and thinks there is solid evidence that co-parenting in the context of family violence is well-established, can bring down the risk of further violence, and can and should be done. Sometimes it can be done. Should it? That should be assessed on a case-by-case basis. With the right supports in place for the abused partner.

My point of saying that someone should seek the help of a lawyer who is versed in partner abuse is on the assumption that they're at the stage of determining custody and access issues of family matters.

Tayken 02-24-2021 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iona6656 (Post 245438)
I re-read the article. I don't think it's total garbage- but the context in which the OP originally posted it- is concerning. Also- the way the article is set up- it's click bait.

It just may be my interpretation- but he seems to be saying "co-parenting can actually bring down the risk of family violence"- but that is contingent on there not being a history of family violence. That seems like a given?

Almost towards the end of the article- he posts this:

" it is erroneous, however, to assume that high conflict cases, in which parents disagree on custodial arrangements for children after divorce, commonly involve serious family violence. "

....that is a decent premise. But the rest is garbled. Plus the article's title is "Co-parenting in the Context of Family Violence"- to which - multiple times throughout the article he says 'Well- if there IS established violence, well- that's a different issue'.

I think it's a good idea to have more discussion around assessing family violence in determining custodial and parenting arrangements. Absolutely. But my concern is that anyone who stumbles across this thread and thinks there is solid evidence that co-parenting in the context of family violence is well-established, can bring down the risk of further violence, and can and should be done. Sometimes it can be done. Should it? That should be assessed on a case-by-case basis. With the right supports in place for the abused partner.

My point of saying that someone should seek the help of a lawyer who is versed in partner abuse is on the assumption that they're at the stage of determining custody and access issues of family matters.

Check out Shaw v. Shaw.

https://www.separation.ca/blog/2008/...-criminal-and/

https://www.canlii.org/en/on/oncj/do...08oncj130.html

As well as this one:

https://www.canlii.org/en/on/onsc/do...4onsc2468.html


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