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A tip about Filing CL Income Tax

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  • A tip about Filing CL Income Tax

    I hadn't filed my taxes during my clr. I had to for financial disclosure.

    Looks like my ex will be on the hook for 1/2 of any tax I may owe.

    I guess she wasn't counting on that.

    Just thought this info might help someone.

  • #2
    so because of your failure to file your tax return, your ex has to pay half of what you owe?? That is so wrong on so many levels. why should she be punished for you not doing something that you should have?? I really hope that it ends up she does not have to pay it and if you wanted to take the high road you would tell her that you will assume responsibility for it.

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    • #3
      They had a common law relationship - meaning that they shared money and in the end split their assets acquired during the relationship. OF COURSE she is responsible to pay her half of the bill (the tax owing) on the money that she benifitted from. She is getting half of the assets AND the liabilities acquired during the relationship. Just because a bill (the tax bill that is) is in only one persons name, does not make it their liability, it is a shared liability. If he had done the taxes while they were together, the tax bill would have been paid and there would have been less to split. She is equally responsible for the taxes. Simple and fair.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by billm View Post
        They had a common law relationship - meaning that they shared money and in the end split their assets acquired during the relationship. OF COURSE she is responsible to pay her half of the bill (the tax owing) on the money that she benifitted from. She is getting half of the assets AND the liabilities acquired during the relationship. Just because a bill (the tax bill that is) is in only one persons name, does not make it their liability, it is a shared liability. If he had done the taxes while they were together, the tax bill would have been paid and there would have been less to split. She is equally responsible for the taxes. Simple and fair.
        Exactly...When we divided family property I had done my taxes but still had not paid the bill of $20K. That amount was included as a liability when calculating net family property and was not challenged.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the posts. I was surprised at the rule - but yes, tax arrears are deemed a joint debt incurred during the relationship.

          And you’re right - BOTH of us spent my income, so if the govt says we overspent, we both should be responsible for paying back what wasn't ours.

          To Standing on the Sidelines: I think you misunderstood me – I posted this tax rule to help others who may not know about it – not to be judged. I did not file taxes for over 30 years because of my beliefs - not to avoid responsibility. I live(d) a self-sufficient, private life. The obstacles to do so require FAR more personal responsibility than you could imagine.

          NOT filing taxes meant I couldn’t call on a govt to pay me an income when I couldn’t work, foot a hospital bill when I was sick, hand me a rebate when I built a house, or loan me money to buy one.

          It meant I could not ask YOU, as a taxpayer, to take care of me in my old age. But now I guess I can. After this litigation, I might have to. My house is my “retirement”.

          Maybe if more people lived this RESPONSIBLY, we wouldn’t have government, taxes, courts OR lawyers would we?

          “Fair”? A lawyer told me I had to get off that podium if I wanted to get through this ordeal. That advice cost me $300. I pay in cash. Wonder if he claimed it on his taxes.

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          • #6
            Okay, not trying to start something, but...

            It is not possible to separate yourself from society such that you can justify not paying taxes because you are 'self sufficient'. You utilize resources directly and indirectly that are part of society - roads, shops, businesses, police, fire, electricity, tv, it goes on and on. Unless youlive in the woods as a guest on someones property, live in a house built without commercial materials, without any utilities, don't drive a car, grow/hunt all your own food, make your own clothes, you are a member of our society, and are a consumer of the resourses offered by that society, which are organized and paid for by taxes.

            Hey, everyone doesn't like to pay taxes, and many (most?) wouldn't if they could get away with it, but please don't justify it by stating that somehow you don't partake in the society around us all.

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            • #7
              You're right. I got off topic. My apologies.

              Comment

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