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  • Child support calculation

    Hi,

    I am looking at my paystub to figure out the child support amount and there are employer benefits do I have to count them as income?

    -I put in $5000 to pension and so did my employer.


    -I received money for eyeglasses


    -I received money for the kids eye glasses that ex also benefited from.


    thank you.

  • #2
    Originally posted by NewDay View Post
    Hi,

    I am looking at my paystub to figure out the child support amount and there are employer benefits do I have to count them as income?

    -I put in $5000 to pension and so did my employer.


    -I received money for eyeglasses


    -I received money for the kids eye glasses that ex also benefited from.


    thank you.
    it isnt based on your paystub, it is based on you tax return

    Comment


    • #3
      If this is to calculate current income then you use the weekly pay amount. If you are looking at the year to date then you look at the gross pay.

      Otherwise you use your taxes/t4.

      Comment


      • #4
        They gave me their paystubs and are asking for mine.
        I gave them my tax return 5 months ago, but I suppose I have to give them pay stubs too, and black out a bunch of information?

        Comment


        • #5
          You dont black anything out. You give them your last three pay stubs. They will look at the gross pay. Everything else is irrelevant.

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          • #6
            how about the child benefit I recieved from the government, my ex requires me to add this in my financial statement so they can calculate child support. Do I need to claim it?

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            • #7
              Benefits are not included for child support calculations. Not to mention if he is paying full table it’s only his income. Your income (minus the benefits) is what is used to calculate section 7 split.

              Comment


              • #8
                in this case, i suppose the tax refund I received from the government is also excluded for calculating the child support?

                Originally posted by rockscan View Post
                Benefits are not included for child support calculations. Not to mention if he is paying full table it�s only his income. Your income (minus the benefits) is what is used to calculate section 7 split.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes. Most agreements clearly state this about one parent being eligible to claim the benefits. If there is a daycare deduction, you take that off the cost of daycare that you split proportionate to income.

                  I have a feeling your ex is trying to include shit to say you have enough money for less child support. It doesnt work that way.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rockscan View Post
                    Yes. Most agreements clearly state this about one parent being eligible to claim the benefits. If there is a daycare deduction, you take that off the cost of daycare that you split proportionate to income.

                    I have a feeling your ex is trying to include shit to say you have enough money for less child support. It doesnt work that way.
                    you are right, he is trying to make me increase my income so he can pay less while my son is living with me 90% of the time.

                    Thank you for replying me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yep so that is full table and the only number that matters is his income. If he wants to get obnoxious and claim it’s a hardship then his new partner’s income comes into play. Bet he would love that one!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NewDay View Post
                        Hi,

                        I am looking at my paystub to figure out the child support amount and there are employer benefits do I have to count them as income?

                        -I put in $5000 to pension and so did my employer.


                        -I received money for eyeglasses


                        -I received money for the kids eye glasses that ex also benefited from.


                        thank you.
                        I see no one really answered your question. It sounds like you have a defined contribution plan. If that's the case, the 10,000 will appear on Line 20600 and 5,000 will appear on line 20700 so this is irrelevant to income for child and spousal support purposes.

                        Was there anything mentioned in your agreement about pension splitting? Or if don't you have an agreement yet, do they want to include it?

                        I was fortunate that her lawyer put nothing in the agreement about pension splitting (either CPP or company pension) and I wasn't about to tell them anything given how they tried to screw me so many times. So my CPP pension and my company pension are all mine.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Child support calculation

                          Originally posted by Desperate_Dad View Post
                          I see no one really answered your question.
                          His question was answered—he wanted to know if the money he gets back for benefits is income for child support. It’s not.

                          It sounds like you have a defined contribution plan. If that's the case, the 10,000 will appear on Line 20600 and 5,000 will appear on line 20700 so this is irrelevant to income for child and spousal support purposes.
                          Correct, not relevant for income calculations.

                          Was there anything mentioned in your agreement about pension splitting? Or if don't you have an agreement yet, do they want to include it?

                          I was fortunate that her lawyer put nothing in the agreement about pension splitting (either CPP or company pension) and I wasn't about to tell them anything given how they tried to screw me so many times. So my CPP pension and my company pension are all mine.
                          This is an equalization argument. Pensions are split as part of the split of assets. Or rather, increases to pensions that occurred during marriage are considered during equalization. Her lawyer may have gotten you another way or she may have realized she was not entitled to it.
                          Last edited by rockscan; 11-30-2021, 09:04 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            CPP doesn't need approval and can be split well after trial if requested.

                            I'm curious about the $5k though. If $5k is taken from today's income to invest in your future pension, matched by employer which is great, why should ex/child suffer now? I could see the 5k (not matched 10k) still being used for support purposes.

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