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Domestic Violence Dealing with abuse and violence. Getting support and help.

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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-20-2012, 01:04 AM
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I did read up Ms Loftus's research,it was fascinating. But what bothers me is why would someone want to plant painful memories into another human being.Its bad enough when it actually happens, and the last thing in hell you want to do is remember or relive.But for someone to actually make up horror stories and inflict then on your psyche is pretty awful.Would make me wonder about the mental state of that person?

but on the pot research
Marijuana Use Takes Toll On Adolescent Brain Function, Research Finds
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:09 AM
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OK Tayken
Relate this back to domestic violence. That's the subforum, right? When you imply you can't know what someone will infer.

FN

Last edited by FreeNow; 08-20-2012 at 01:15 AM.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:17 AM
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Wowee, this is one heavy-duty conversation. On the topic of "memory" - I'd like to add that I have an incredible long-term memory. Not so good with short term. I find when I'm angered, or nervous and things have been said (either by me, and/or someone else) I tend to not be able to accurately recall what was said. That is more a result of being flustered though, as opposed to poor memory.

There are other things (incidents more so) that I can recall in vivid detail. I do not drink alcohol in excess, never have. As for pot: I have tried it on occasion, but not to any great extent. Stress and a medication I take for anxiety is what I consider the causes of some of my occasional absent-mindedness. A side effect of some anxiety medications is in fact, proven to impact short-term memory.

It's odd. I remember dates and birthdays very well. I can even remember the names of all my teachers. In some ways, I'm like "rainman" - and "I'm an excellent driver." (Dustin Hoffman).

But ask me what I did with my car keys some days, or my glasses - and that's a big challenge. I had a dream recently in which I recalled in vivid detail an old radio that was on my mom's kitchen table. An odd thing to dream about - but yet I remembered it down to the last detail. I know this, b/c I asked her about it (the radio).

Anyways... I don't know if what I've said has much (or anything) to do with what this thread is about - but I decided to put my 2 cents in.

Last edited by hadenough; 08-20-2012 at 01:25 AM.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:25 AM
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Ms Loftus's research has a direct correlation to the domestic violence issue. If a person is exposed to constant questioning of there memories ,then they may start doubting there version of reality and add a fictional element to it.If one were to for eg.go to a womens shelter and be surrounded by stories of violence and questioned by counsellors if they had been a victim of violence or abuse, then there is a possibility that one may actually start imaging that they too had experienced violence.It may start as an empathic reaction to their surrounding and end up as a full on false memory.
Considering all those lawsuits as described in this link

Creating False Memories
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:43 AM
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OK Tayken
Relate this back to domestic violence. That's the subforum, right? When you imply you can't know what someone will infer.

FN
Murphyslaw did an excellent job of answering this question already. What do you mean "subform"? Do you in fact mean the relationship between the relevance of "false memories" and their impact on domestic violence? A false allegation (and often are) based on "false memories". Murphyslaw breaks down how a false memory could be induced rather logically and eloquently so I won't bother trying to readdress it.

False memories are not about "implying you can't know what someone will infer" do you mean, you can't "predict" how someone will represent a memory? If that is what you are implying it is common knowledge that you can't look into a crystal ball and see the future. But, when a "memory" (read: hearsay) is presented in the form of affidavit evidence and a well educated litigant is familiar with the deep rooted understanding of "false memories" one can leverage the very detailed information from the above metioned professional to formulate a proper methodology for calling the "hearsay evidence" into question.

In fact, if you read the materials carefully, you will find the counter questions used by these experts in this area of study whom, themselves are often called upon as expert witnesses before the courts and their methodology (Socratic questioning in nature) for finding flaw is the "false memory" and be armed with how to relate it back with cogent and relevant counter evidence that the memory may in fact be a false statement.

So, if someone is being leveled with false allegations of intimate partner abuse and child abuse, the provided information would be highly relevant not only to the litigant in breaking down the hearsay and disproving it as "fact" but, a solicitor, judge or other expert evaluating the "hearsay"... Especially in the balance of "probabilities". Using this methodology which has significant (20+ years) of research behind it is quite effective.

Hope this answers your question. Thanks Murphyslaw for your response as well. Very insightful and well thought out.

Also, it is also incredibly useful to understand "false memories" when dealing with a Psychologist whom's theories of practice are based mostly on "repressive memories" from child hood and how they impact your current life. Mostly psychologist who practice in the area of psychoanalysis are significantly flawed at times as much of their "belief" in their professional practice is based on Freudian theories of ego, id and the impact childhood development has on you in your adult life. They tend to ignore and some even demonstrate a disdain for Cognitive Based Therapeutic results which have a much higher and measurable success rate than to "psychoanalysis".

Psychologists are primarily psychotropic drug pushers who are more interested in exploring your child hood and trying to make some relationship to your current pattern of behaviors based on studies and theories originally conducted by Dr. Freud of which many have not been updated to consider current day sociological developments and new evidence based medicine that has developed in psychiatry.

Good Luck!
Tayken

Last edited by Tayken; 08-20-2012 at 02:50 AM.
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Old 08-20-2012, 11:42 AM
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I didn't know psychologists could prescribe medication. While I know psychologists all study the same theories I didn't know they all were of the freudian persuasion when they graduated and opened their own practicies.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Tayken View Post
Psychologists are primarily psychotropic drug pushers who are more interested in exploring your child hood and trying to make some relationship to your current pattern of behaviors based on studies and theories originally conducted by Dr. Freud of which many have not been updated to consider current day sociological developments and new evidence based medicine that has developed in psychiatry.
I have to take exception to this. Psychological education barely covers Freud and contemporaries' theories nowadays, and when they are touched on, it's in a "haha, wasn't the infancy of psychology quaint?" sort of way. While I'm sure there are still a few out there who do practice it, and a few clients who find it valuable, it's much like electroshock therapy in that it's certainly far from the standard now.

And yes, if drugs are going to be part of treatment, a psychologist would refer the patient to a psychiatrist, as they are the ones with the MDs. Most psychological research shows that drugs are most effective when taken in coordination with therapy, especially cognitive based.

I'm surprised at such stereotyping from you, Tayken.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:39 PM
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I have noticed some people refer to the DSM frequently. This is one of many diagnostic tool used by the medical profession and not intended for the general public. In fact it is reckless to pick up the book and try to figure out where someone fits in the scale of psychological disorders. Undergraduates at universities are warned regularly not to try to "diagnose" themselves or friends using this manual.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:55 PM
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I have to take exception to this. Psychological education barely covers Freud and contemporaries' theories nowadays, and when they are touched on, it's in a "haha, wasn't the infancy of psychology quaint?" sort of way. While I'm sure there are still a few out there who do practice it, and a few clients who find it valuable, it's much like electroshock therapy in that it's certainly far from the standard now.
Actually, in fact, pschoanalysis is still based on Freudian concepts of "ID" and "EGO" which is the primary focus of "psychiatrists" generally. You can find the streams of debates beteen psychologists and psychiatrists on the internet and their complaints of both practices of medicine.

I note that I mixed up the two schools of medicine and it should have been "psychiatrists" and not "psychologists". Psychiatrists are registered with medical bodies and have prescribing practice rights. Thank-you for identifying the mix up in terminology and your exception is well placed.

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And yes, if drugs are going to be part of treatment, a psychologist would refer the patient to a psychiatrist, as they are the ones with the MDs.
Most common path would be to the family practitioner for the prescription though. Not to suggest the clinical pathing you are suggesting does not happen but, generally a psychologist (keeping terms right here and not reversing them) is usually an integrated clinician in a patient's circle of care and should have a relationship with the family practitioner.

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Most psychological research shows that drugs are most effective when taken in coordination with therapy, especially cognitive based.

I'm surprised at such stereotyping from you, Tayken.
I reversed the two practices of medicine. I am not fond of "psychiatrists" and how they conduct their practice of medicine and the lack of "evidence based medicine" and research in their methodologies. I am biased towards Cognitive Behaviour Therapies, which I don't avoid disclosing, which generally have significantly more tangible evidence based medicine in support of their practices and procedures than "psychodynamic" therapy...

Hope this clarifies my position on the two schools of mental health and medicine.

Last edited by Tayken; 08-20-2012 at 01:02 PM.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by arabian View Post
I have noticed some people refer to the DSM frequently. This is one of many diagnostic tool used by the medical profession and not intended for the general public. In fact it is reckless to pick up the book and try to figure out where someone fits in the scale of psychological disorders. Undergraduates at universities are warned regularly not to try to "diagnose" themselves or friends using this manual.
DSM is used by "Psychologists" generally and is not accepted by many "Psychiatrists". They would rely upon another clinical coding system which is incredibly immature in comparison to DSM overall.

This is known as the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (DPM):

Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual: (PDM): Amazon.ca: Alliance of Psychoanalytic Organizations: Books

Again, my apologies to everyone for reversing Psychologist with Psychiatrist.
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