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Old 03-24-2017, 11:10 AM
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Tayken Tayken is offline
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Originally Posted by zanman View Post
I agree with Tayken

I am in the same boat it can take allot out of you. I try and be the best parent I can be with my kids and I find being busy with them is a great support for all of this.
To this point... I believe William Eddy wrote an article (trying to find it) about being hyper vigilant over your divorce and how it can actually make your situation worse. It is almost like "Divorce PTSD" although it is not post (after) but, more like a current TSD.

Everyone needs to know that every little allegation, every little thing, and every little comment doesn't always require a response. It is hard for many people to sort out what is relevant and what really isn't.

Also, being too vigilant with it all can cause you to make significant mistakes. It can make you look "controlling" or "high conflict".

I personally think that many people experience an adjustment disorder (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjustment_disorder) after divorce that goes untreated. The major stressor being the divorce (custody, access, etc...) which brings major change.

If your divorce is starting to take up a considerable amount of your time and causes you anxiety there is NOTHING WRONG with seeking assistance from a psychologist/psychiatrist. Mental health is important to parent! Very important.

If you find yourself thinking about your divorce and what you need to do about it too much then it is time to talk to someone. I always recommend a clinician who practices Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. CBT is great for technical thinkers who often over-analyze their situations.

Clearly, you have recognized Trinton that your divorce is engulfing your life and impacting you personally. Now may be the time to seek some help. It isn't a bad thing. Actually, it is a good thing. Talking to a professional can help you notice your emotions and help you react to them better.

Good Luck!
Tayken
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